BJA JUNIOR NOVICE – 1ST MON SYLLABUS

This is the first post in a series, where we shall be examining what your child needs to be able to do to progress through the grades/belts in Judo.

We shall start with the British Judo Association “Mon” system.
Mons are the first steps along the grading path, the Mon system is for younger children 5-7 years of age; you child can progress one Mon every 3 months. In this post we shall look at the very first grade 1st Mon, this is your child’s first experience of grading, so your knowing what is required and helping your child remember it will help ensure it is a positive experience for them.

According to the BJA syllabus ( available at the BJA website ) your child needs to know the following to grade to first Mon:

NOVICE – 1ST MON

FUNDAMENTAL SKILLS
Ukemi (Breakfalls): Ushiro Ukemi
Tachi-waza (throw): Osoto-otoshi
Osae-komi-waza (hold down): Kesa-gatame

PERFORMANCE SKILLS

Osoto-otoshi into Kesa-gatame
Escape from Kesa-gatame by ‘trapping Uke’s leg

PERSONAL CHOICE
Candidates are required to demonstrate two of their favourite techniques.

TERMINOLOGY AND SUPPLEMENTARY KNOWLEDGE
Know the common English translations and meaning of all Japanese terminology used in this section  to translate the following Japanese words into their common English names and where appropriate explain their meaning:

  • Rei
  • Hajime
  • Matte

Answer the question in which country was Judo devised?

Here are some images and explanations to help you:

Ushiro Ukemi - Backwards Breakfall from JudoInfo.com

Ushiro Ukemi - Backwards Breakfall from JudoInfo.com

O Soto Otoshi - Large Outer Drop from Judoinfo.com

O Soto Otoshi - Large Outer Drop from Judoinfo.com

Kesa Gatame from JudoInfo.com

Kesa Gatame from JudoInfo.com

Japanese words:

  • Rei – Bow
  • Hajime – Begin/Start
  • Matte – End/Stop

And Judo originated in Japan.

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This entry was posted by lancew on Thursday, January 8th, 2009 at 10:13 pm and is filed under Judo . You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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